Burglary

Theft is not a necessary ingredient to a burglary charge under Florida state law. By entering a home, business, structure or vehicle with the intent to commit a crime, you may be charged with burglary, even if a property was known to be open to the public. Even if you enter property lawfully, you may be charged with burglary if your permission to remain has been withdrawn or no consent was offered by anyone with authority over the place.

Understand The Charges You Face

Burglary is a serious crime with serious consequences:

  • Burglary of a dwelling is a second-degree felony, punishable with up to 15 years in prison, 15 years of probation and $10,000 in fines.
  • Burglary of an occupied structure is a second-degree felony, punishable with up to 15 years in prison, 15 years of probation and $10,000 in fines.
  • Burglary of an unoccupied structure is a third-degree felony, punishable with up to five years in prison, five years of probation and $5,000 in fines.
  • Burglary of a conveyance (vehicle of any kind) is a third-degree felony, punishable with up to five years in prison, five years of probation and $5,000 in fines.

Many people are surprised to realize the extent of felonies they face when charged with burglary. Seemingly minor acts of misconduct may be charged this heavily, and any burglary charge may be enhanced if a weapon was involved or if anyone was assaulted or injured.

If you or a loved one has been charged with burglary, you need immediate, experienced legal help. As a Bradenton-area burglary defense attorney with more than 20 years of legal experience, I, D. Scott Rieth, can protect your rights and prepare a solid defense case on your behalf.

Contact me at 941-404-4192 or 888-352-3179 toll free. I offer free initial consultations, and I am responsive 24/7.

Defending A Burglary Case

Sometimes a seemingly harmless act of intimidation, revenge or even a prank can be charged as a burglary. Property damage or vandalism may be accompanied by a burglary charge. Burglary can accompany almost any criminal charge if the entry into a dwelling, structure or conveyance without appropriate permission or with the intent to commit a crime was involved in the incident.

However, your defense begins with intent. The burden is on the prosecutor to prove that you intended to commit a crime. Without proof, the charges could be downgraded to trespassing or breaking and entering. Your case could even be dismissed.

Other circumstances such as needing to find shelter in an emergency or having permission to be in a "burglarized property" may also be valid defenses. You have options and you deserve adequate defense.

Consult A Burglary Lawyer

Contact me today to schedule a free and confidential initial consultation at 941-404-4192 or 888-352-3179 toll free.